News for Greens

In 1959, a white journalist traveled the Deep South posing as a black man. The conditions horrified him.

Posted by in Rights

In 1959, Texas journalist John Howard Griffin darkened his skin and lived for six weeks as a black man in the segregated South. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll describe his harrowing story and what it showed about the true state of race relations in America. John Howard Griffin (June 16, 1920 – September 9, 1980) was an American journalist and author, much of whose writing was about racial equality. He is best known for darkening his skin and journeying through Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia to experience segregation in the Deep South in 1959. He wrote…read more

Black Exhaustion

Posted by in Commentary, Rights

By Pilot Viruet – Matter When we were children, my older brother and I looked nearly identical. So identical, in fact, that I sometimes successfully convinced strangers that we were twins, despite the two-year age difference. We wore similar boys’ clothes: baggy jeans, oversized T-shirts boasting our favorite hip-hop artists, construction boots, and camouflage jackets from our military father. I wore my hair in thick cornrow braids, typically underneath a baseball cap. I was often mistaken for a little boy and, because I’ve always been an androgynous tomboy who wanted to…read more

Repetitive Motion Disorder: Black Reality and White Denial in America

Posted by in Commentary, rights, Violence

By Tim Wise I suppose there is no longer much point in debating the facts surrounding the shooting of Michael Brown. First, because Officer Darren Wilson has been cleared by a grand jury, and even the collective brilliance of a thousand bloggers pointing out the glaring inconsistencies in his version of events that August day won’t result in a different outcome. And second, because Wilson’s guilt or innocence was always somewhat secondary to the larger issue: namely, the issue of this gigantic national inkblot staring us in the face, and what…read more