Archive for the 'Green Party' Category

Green Party Members say, “Fund schools without property tax increase”

The Green Party of Philadelphia (GPOP) objects to Mayor Michael Nutter's budget for Fiscal 2016 because it heaps the cost of school services upon poor and working people. Meeting on April 22 at Cavanaugh's Restaurant in University City, Green Party members rejected Nutter's proposed tax increases and urged Philadelphia's City Council to tax the wealthy to pay for the public education of future citizens. Read more>>

James Lane for Congress – District 11 NY

James Lane Congress District 11

 

votejameslane.nationbuilder.com

 

Pennsylvania Green Party Opposes Governor Tom Wolf’s Regressive Tax Plan

Governor Wolf's tax plan negatively impacts working and low income people in Pennsylvania. Already considered one of the "Terrible Ten" states with the most regressive tax systems, Wolf's plan does little to address the problem. Property tax is a major Pennsylvania issue, but Wolf offsets cuts with significant increases in regressive sales and income taxes. Read press release>>

Madison Greens endorse 7 local candidates in Spring 2015 election

The Four Lakes Green Party, based in Dane County, Wisconsin, has issued endorsements in local elections for April 2015. From the Wisconsin Green Party: The Four Lakes Green Party has endorsed seven candidates for local office in Madison and Fitchburg. Help us elect more Greens to local government by volunteering, making a financial contribution, and […]

Hawkins, to protest and push progressive ideas

ENDORSEMENTS 2014: FOR GOVERNOR

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About Howie Hawkins

Endorsing Green Party candidate Howie Hawkins is a form of protest, but it’s also an endorsement of Hawkins’ dogged effort to put important, progressive ideas before the public.

Hawkins has received almost no coverage in this campaign. The media seem to mention him (along with Libertarian candidate Michael McDermott) simply because he’s on the ballot. And some dismiss him as having ideas too far out in left field to pay attention to.

Some of Hawkins’ ideas are indeed not realistic. Others may be sound, but they’re expensive, and Hawkins’ tax-reform proposals aren’t likely to pay the full cost. But on many issues, progressive New Yorkers are more in sync with Hawkins than with Andrew Cuomo. And that’s likely true of many moderates as well.

Hawkins’ position papers contain more detail, and more food for thought, than those of all the other candidates combined. And through them, he is painting a picture of the kind of New York many of us wish we could aspire to.

On Hawkins’ list of reforms:

• A $15 minimum wage and “a living income above poverty level” for everyone who can’t work.

• A publicly funded single-payer health care system.

• An end to high-stakes testing, Common Core, and Race to the Top. Free tuition to SUNY and CUNY.

• Tax credits for renters. A moratorium on home foreclosures. Requiring that all mortgages be refinanced at the homes’ current market value. Construction of new, high-quality mixed-income housing. Expanded public transit and construction of intra-urban rail lines and high-speed long-distance rail lines.

• A ban on fracking. No new fossil-fuel infrastructure: no trains, trucks, or barges carrying shale oil through the state. No storage of natural gas, liquefied propane, or liquefied butane in the Seneca Lake salt caverns. Closure of the Indian Point nuclear power plant and phasing out of all the others.

• An end to “corporate welfare.” Requiring the state to pay for services it mandates local governments to provide. More progressive estate taxes and an increase in taxes on the wealthiest New Yorkers, taking them back to the levels of the 1970’s, which, Hawkins says, would enable the state to reduce taxes for others and could fund investment in infrastructure and other initiatives.

• Publicly owned power and fuel companies. Universal access to high-speed internet. Preservation of net neutrality and blockage of the Comcast-Time Warner merger.

• Restoration of funding for the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation. Promotion of a “zero-waste solid waste policy,” including boosting reuse and recycling efforts. Stronger wetland protection.

• Ending segregation in housing and schools. Establishing a state civil rights department. Banning solitary confinement, expanding educational opportunities for prisoners, and restoring voting rights for convicted felons.

• Requiring 12 weeks of paid family leave. Subsidized high-quality child-care and elder care. Extension of labor rights to farmworkers. Medicaid funding for abortions. Restoration of state funding for homeless-youth centers. Public financing for campaigns.

There’s much, much more on Hawkins’ website (howiehawkins.org): progressive ideas on agriculture, women’s rights, criminal justice, immigrant rights, LGBT rights, ethics in government.

Hawkins has no chance at becoming governor. Sadly, few of his proposals stand any better chance at getting adopted. That’s proof of the drift of the state and the country away from the progressive philosophies of the past, when measures like Social Security and national park protections could get adopted and Republicans like Theodore Roosevelt thought that huge companies had too much power.

There was a time when New York political campaigns included a robust discussion of progressive ideas. Now, only people like Hawkins are talking about them, and Hawkins is routinely ignored.

That’s an indication of the strength of the conservative movement. And Hawkins deserves support in his effort to push back.

Read more at Rochester City Newspaper>>

Hawkins Ready To Debate Major Party Opponents

English: Howie Hawkins

Howie Hawkins (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Howie Hawkins said today that while he is looking forward to participating in a gubernatorial debate in Buffalo with Governor Cuomo and Republican Rob Astorino, he said that all debates should be open to all candidates on the ballot.
“The law should be changed so that if you want to run for office in New York State, you have to agree to participate in a series of public debates with all candidates who meet the legal requirements to be on the ballot,” said Hawkins.

Hawkins noted that after Jesse Ventura’s first debate in Minnesota, his support doubled, and after seven more open debates, he was elected Governor. At 9% in the polls, Hawkins is polling better than Ventura was before debates were held.

“New York State has a progressive majority and I am the only progressive left on the ballot. New York progressives have a right to have their candidate in all the debates,” Hawkins said.

“Debates aired over the public airwaves, co-sponsored by a public radio station, should include all candidates. The arbitrary selection of who is allowed to participate in debates is an affront to the democratic process,” Hawkins said, in reference to the sponsorship of public radio’s WNYC and the Wall Street Journal of a debate to which Hawkins has not been invited. The Wall Street Journal’s own September 24 poll showed that 78% of voters want all of the candidates on the ballot in debates.

Hawkins’ poll numbers have steadily increased during the campaign season since he polled 4% in June in the first poll that included him. A Siena poll released on Sept 23 showed Hawkins at 24% in his hometown of Syracuse. Hawkins is polling better than any independent progressive statewide candidate in New York’s history. Polls released the week of September 22 show Hawkins at 9% (Marist) and 7% (Siena) statewide.

Hawkins has accepted the debate invitation from The Buffalo News and WNED-WBFO. Hawkins has also accepted an invitation to a televised debate proposed by WRGB (CBS) the Sinclair Broadcasting Group.

Howie Hawkins talks People Power

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